Analysis Of Alcoa 's Core Practices

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Introduction
Last year, the community of Ferndale was in chaos over the upcoming curtailment of Alcoa Intalco Aluminum Works. This company strongly invested in its community ranging from charity works and investments to different scholarships offered for the vast beneficial of the community so when the rumor started, every employee suffered the upcoming turmoil with hard-work, dedications that exceeded expectations, continuous loyalty and grace. Over 500 jobs were hanging in the balance and the epidemic vast increase in mortgage rates, rents, energy crisis and economical markets and growth that washed over the state of Washington, it simply was not easy. Finding a solution was not as simple as one thought but somehow, the company came
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On May 2000, Alcoa executives entertained the idea of building a power plant for Intalco however resulted in selling its power back to BPA, supposedly to help cover the energy crisis which is the plant’s most challenging aspect of its business. “BPA pays for the wages and benefits of nearly all the workers, plus $1.75 million to cover Intalco’s tax burden,” in 2001 as reported in The Bellingham Herald printed on the August 2016 article. In 2002, it reopened two potlines that were idle for 6 months which a year later were forced to shut down again due to high energy cost. This move did cost 200 employees out of a job. In 2006, Alcoa Inc. became the full owner of Alcoa Intalco Works after buying out its partners and later signed a five-year contract with BPA for its 450 employees, and eventually re-opened the second potline. In 2008, there was a contiguity for budget cuts including 100 jobs due to low demands in aluminum which later increased in 2009 after BPA and Alcoa Intalco agreed over enough low-cost power to last another seven years.
Alcoa created its aluminum using a process called Hall-Herould through electrolysis since aluminum is highly reactive, also requires a lot of power. This single aluminum plant uses as much electricity as the city of Tacoma to produce billet, foundry, T-ingot, and standard ingot. The company currently spends a lot of money researching ways to use less power. It, however, still takes an
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