Analysis Of Death Of A Salesman By Arthur Miller

1270 Words6 Pages
Death of a Salesman, by Arthur Miller
1245 Words 5 Pages
Death of A Salesman, written by Arthur Miller, is a play based on the turmoil within an average American family. Miller wrote Death of A Salesman easily showcasing the elements of drama. I was easily able to follow the plot, identify with his characters, and picture the setting.

The main theme of the plot seemed to be Willy reaching for the "American Dream". Financial success, business success, outwardly perfect family, revered by your peers, and in general respected by all. Early on in the play two things are evident to the reader; Willy 's questionable mental status, and his tumultuous relationship with his sons.

Willy is apparently suffering from some sort of mental or
…show more content…
Wagner 's. He is also unable to come to terms with his own advancing years as a salesman. He only goes to Mr. Wagner to ask for a job strictly in New York when Linda insists. What he sees as valuable experience others see as obsolete. Willy longs for the days when the boys revered him and they were pals.

Scott Foll states the driving point of plot is conflict (1182). This play definitely has the ultimate conflict. That is simply, family. Conflict with Willy and Biff, Willy with himself, and Linda with her sons. For me the turning climactic point is when while talking with Ben, Willy believes he can regain what he lost years ago with Biff by ending his life. He thinks the twenty-thousand from the insurance money will fix it all. I suppose the resolution in this play was Willy 's death. Although I do not imagine this could truly be resolution for the remaining family.

Characterization seemed to be the most well developed element of the play. The patriarch of the family, Willy Loman was portrayed as the tragic hero. I believe his character did indeed possess some character flaws that inevitably led to his death. However, I agree with the character summary written in Spark Notes that Willy never achieved the self-realization or self-knowledge to be labeled a true tragic hero (Miller). He never fully realizes is personal failures, even with his death. His pride
Get Access