Analysis Of Jonathan Safran Foer's 'The Sixth Veil'

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The literary device of symbols is vital to a story because of the added depth they provide to mundane and regular objects. In “The Sixth Borough”, by Jonathan Safran Foer, the separation of the islands of the sixth borough and Manhattan represents the transition from childhood to adulthood. In “The Minister's Black Veil”, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, the veil represents the secret sin of Mr. Hooper, the town's minister. Both symbols, although seem plain on the outside, hide a deeper meaning that give insight to the story. In “The Sixth Borough”, by Jonathan Safran Foer, the island or sixth borough connection to Manhattan represents the change from childhood to adulthood. In the beginning of the story, each year the islands has a festival where a jumper jumps the distance between the two islands. Celebration and joy fill both islands as people gather to watch the event. When describing the jumper Foer writes, “Or perhaps “suspension” is a better word. Because what was so inspiring about the leap was not how the jumper got from one borough to the other, but how he stayed between them for so long.” The author describes the jumper as “suspended”. The distance between the boroughs represents the suspension of time between childhood and adulthood. When the festival first begins the sixth borough is new and “young”, and the jumper could easily jump from one island to the other, however, as the story progresses Foer writes, “one year -- many, many years ago -- the end of the jumper’s

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