Analysis Of Martin Luther King Jr.

1308 WordsJul 20, 20176 Pages
“If we are to have peace on earth, our loyalties must become ecumenical rather than sectional. Our loyalties must transcend our race, our tribe, our class, and our nation; and this means we must develop a world perspective,” said Martin Luther King Jr. No other race of people on earth have been persecuted and oppressed more than the Jews. This persistent reality of their history is a sharp reminder that history does repeat itself and it’s not always beneficial. During the Roman Empire in the first century of the Common Era, we see both Caesar Augustus and Tiberius treat the Jews favorably to the extent of giving them imperial protection. This was not an unusual gesture because the Romans were pantheistic worshipers and were more liberal…show more content…
In Egypt, Umar returned power to the Bishop of Alexandrea who was a fugitive during roman rule. The Bishop said, "today I witness in this city of Alexandria, salvation and contentment reigning after a long period of persecution by the Roman Rulers.” http://eng.dar-alifta.org/foreign/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=543 During the reign of the Catholic kings in Spain, after the fall of the romans between 586 to 711 C.E., there was an increased persecution of the Jews. King Recceswinth’s conversion from Arianism to Catholicism brought about a sudden piety in his faith combined with anti-Jewish sentiments. He formally issued laws forgiving the debts of all the Christians who he claimed were being oppressed by the Jews. This situation was brought about because the Jews were successful entrepreneurs and tradesmen and had accumulated significant property and wealth to such a degree, that they owned nearly a third of the empire making the reigning monarch uneasy. The Christians being forbidden to charge taxes, had no incentive of profit to be part of the trade. The Jews however, did and ended up not only wealthy but owning Christian servants who could not pay back their debts. They even ended up with collateral from the churches that borrowed for them. This economic and social discrepancy was reason enough for the then monarch to enforce an unjust law, forcing them to convert to
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