Analysis Of My Mother, The Crazy African By Chimamanda Adichie

1497 Words6 Pages
Chimamanda Adichie is an author from Nigeria, a major country in Africa. She is an exceedingly well-known author from her writings on immigration, feminism, and the African experience in America. She has given a variety of Ted talks, speeches, and has done interviews on immigration, feminism, and the African experience in America. In her writings, most noticeably “My Mother, the Crazy African,” she talks about the experience of immigrants in America and through a lens which relates to issues one from all walks of life can understand. Her book shows a growing divide between the understanding of “American Culture” and other cultures from around the world, in this book, most specifically Nigeria in this case. The analysis in this essay will take place through examining similar work as well as her interviews and speeches. “My Mother, the Crazy African” is a story about a Nigerian girl named Ralindu, and her struggles to assimilate in America. She moves to Philadelphia and lives there for three years. Her mother has a hard time getting used to America, and this causes a growing rift between her and her daughter. This rift, and how they each subsequently deal, is the main conflict in this story. Ralindu wishes to be more like the typical American; she prefers more American food, has an American nickname Lin, has a more Caucasian group of friends, and refuses to speak her native language of Igbo (Adichie, 53-69). This is a common trend among children who immigrate to the U.S.

    More about Analysis Of My Mother, The Crazy African By Chimamanda Adichie

      Get Access