Analysis Of The Necklace By Guy De Maupassant

1405 WordsAug 1, 20176 Pages
One of Guy De Maupassant 's literary influences was Gustave Flaubert, who taught him to write. Flaubert 's teaching principles suggested that the "writer must look at everything to find some aspect of it that no one has yet seen or expressed,". Maupassant succeeded in being a writer He wrote "realistic fiction" and greatly influences writers still "The Necklace" was written in the 19th century Literary Realism period. The story focuses on "everyday events, lives, and the relationships of middle/lower class," and it provides a glimpse of normal people and how they are influenced by "social and economic forces" The meaning of "The Necklace" is developed through the depiction of the characters and the plot of the story. Maupassant stated that…show more content…
The day of the ball proved to be everything Mathilde imagined, but it all ends when she loses the necklace. Although M. Loisel and Mathilde find a replacement necklace, they spend "ten years in grinding poverty until they finally paid off their debt," only to discover that the necklace was not a diamond necklace but just "mere costume jewelry". Charters defines plot as the "sequence of events in a story and their relation to one another as they develop and usually resolve a conflict". In the exposition of "The Necklace," Maupassant provides a detailed "character portrait" of Mathilde and offers some important details about M. Loisel. It is obvious that conflict exists inside of Mathilde. She feels she is too good for the life she leads. She is unhappy with who she is and dreams of being someone else. On the contrary, M. Loisel is happy and satisfied to come home to his wife who prepares him an "economical but tasty meal". Mathilde is very materialistic and believes that riches would end her suffering, she won 't even visit a rich friend and "former classmate at the convent" because she is so jealous and envious. The rising action of the plot begins when M. Loisel presents the invitation to Mathilde. This presentation only aggravates the conflict that exists within Mathilde and she cannot imagine going to the ball in any of her old dresses. Mathilde sheds two pitiful tears and M. Loisel "quickly decides to sacrifice his savings"
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