Analysis Of ' The 's ' Of ' And The Quiet, Proper Victorian Woman '

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A prevalent theme throughout Dracula is that of a woman’s role in society. The main female protagonist, Mina, is a delicate balance between the strong and independent “New Woman” and the quiet, proper Victorian woman that was customary in English society prior to the 1900s. She embodies the kindness, sense of duty, and femininity of a Victorian woman, while tentatively embracing the strength, bravery, and intelligence of “New Women.” Despite this slight reform, Mina still desires to be seen a meek, righteous woman. In fact, all of the protagonists - including Mina - view both Mina and the role she plays in the novel as minimal. The only man that grasps the vitalness of Mina’s contributions is not even a man at all. The point in the novel when Dracula first speaks to Mina in her bedroom, with Jonathan lying unconscious nearby, reveals much more than the surface dialogue suggests. When historical context, close observation of word choice, and the characters’ personal views are taken into account, Stoker expresses that though this is the first time the audience is aware of any interaction between Count Dracula and Mina, Dracula displays a keen understanding and borderline respect for Mina’s mental capabilities that exceed that of any of her male companions in the novel. In Mina’s words, recorded by Seward, Dracula told her “And so you, like the others, would play your brains against mine.” (Citing) Though Dracula conveyed the words in a mocking tone, perhaps Stoker meant them

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