Analysis of The Red Room by H.G Wells, The Signalman by Charles Dickens, and An Arrest by Ambrose Bierce

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Analysis of The Red Room by H.G Wells, The Signalman by Charles Dickens, and An Arrest by Ambrose Bierce The Victorian era, spanning from 1830-1901, was a period of dramatic change with the rapid extension of colonialism through Africa, Asia and the West Indies making England a world power and relocating the perceived centre of western civilisation to London. Advances in industry, science, technology, architecture, medicine and travel were among these changes as well as the growing interest, among the masses, in the occult, supernatural and life. H.G Wells' book "The Red Room" is the first I will examine. The story begins when a young scientist sets out to prove that the "Red Room" in a castle is…show more content…
Both "vastness" and "ocean" make the reader feel lost and fearful of the unknown activities and size of the room. Other words like "mystery" and "suggestion" add to create the effect of fear and suspense. Many other words such as "omens", "spiritual", "ghosts", "witches", "shadows", "echoes", "haunted", "spectral" and "subterranean" are piled on the reader to create a sense of fear, vulnerability and death. Next is "The Signalman" by Charles Dickens, which is about a visit from a ghost. The setting for this story is very old, depressing, dingy and gloomy but the scenery around the signalman isn't reflected in his personality. His "box" is located underground next to the railway line. Straight away the setting seems to be weird as it's descending down, as if almost entering hell, "zigzag path descending down". I think this because most nice stairways are straight and go up, not uneven. The writer also describes the place as a "great dungeon"; this says to me that it's a place of death and torture because those are the words I would think of when "dungeon" is mentioned. Also it says there was a "gloomy red light, and the gloomier entrance to a black, in whose massive architecture there was a barbourus, depressing and forbidding air". This makes the reader think that this
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