Analysis of This is Moscow Speaking

1013 WordsSep 25, 20135 Pages
The Fear of Conformity From Stalin’s Cult of Personality to Khrushchev’s period of De-Stalinization, the nation of the Soviet Union was in endless disarray of what to regard as true in the sense of a socialist direction. The short story, This is Moscow Speaking, written by Yuli Daniel (Nikolai Arzhak) represents the ideology that the citizens of the USSR were constantly living in fear of the alternations of their nation’s political policies. Even more, the novella gives an explanation for the people’s desire to conform to the principles around them. This is Moscow Speaking asks the crucial question of its time: will there ever be stability? Because this short story was written in 1962, before the Stagnation Period, there was no real…show more content…
Literally, and I mean this within in the story itself, Toyla tries to resist this obedience to the government. The turning point of this decision is when he realizes that he will not kill just because it is legal: he is sticking to his moral codes, not from society, but as a human being. When someone attempts to kill him “for the sake of the Motherland”, Toyla still manages to break free of the social and political norms with his decision to not kill a fellow human being (Daniel 57). Publically, the author, Daniel himself, is actively protesting the government through his writing of This is Moscow Speaking. He is doing exactly what the government disagrees with: he is speaking out to the public through his morality of what he believes is right. Daniel was a dissident or as Vail and Genis like to call him, “the otherwise-minded” (Vail and Genis 9). Daniel, along with other dissidents of his time, had a fear that society would continue to conform to the always changing policies of the soviet regime: “for many the road toward ‘otherwise-mindedness’ came out of fear of the appearance of a new cult of personality: ‘We saw that once again one name flashes from newspapers and the posters, again the most banal and rude pronouncements of this person are presented as a revelation and quintessence of wisdom…’” (Vail and Genis 10). By writing this story, he showed the nation that this compliance with the government needed to stop
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