Analysis of the Wedding Dance

1071 Words Sep 30th, 2010 5 Pages
Culture Dominating Nature in The Wedding Dance by Amador Daguio The Wedding Dance by Amador Daguio is almost always interpreted as a love story between two married couple – Awiyao and Lumnay. Most readers thought the story focuses on how a man can be so selfish to hurt a woman like Lumnay, on how Lumnay sacrificed her happiness for the one she loved, on how painful the story of Awiyao and Lumnay ended, on how true love does not always have a happy ending. However, the story can also be interpreted more deeply as one reads between the lines – not just analyzing the text literally. The story suggests the conflict between nature and culture. Simply defining those terms - nature describes how a human normally acts, while culture deals …show more content…
Ironically, the humans were now the one who are adjusting to culture. Another evidence of this paradox was the resignation of Lumnay at the end of the story. Seeing the blazing bonfire at the end of the village (which symbolizes the unwritten law), she surrendered her desire to stop the ritual and to question the law of her tribe. Though she has the courage, she realized how powerful the society was. Culture won against nature. In order to further understand these conflicts, imageries and symbolisms were inserted in the story. These gave additional evidences regarding the central theme of the story. The description of the author about the gangsas - the sound of the gangsas beat through the walls of the dark house like muffled roars of falling waters – can be related to the event where Lumnay and Awiyao were climbing to go to the other side of the mountain. It was when they were ready to face everything to be together. The author illustrated it as “the waters boiled in her mind in forms of white and jade and roaring silver; the waters tolled and growled, resounded in thunderous echoes through the walls of the stiff cliffs.” The use of water in both cases was not simply a coincidence. It gives the indication that at the start of the story, there was the optimism that Lumnay could conquer the gangsas (rituals and culture of their tribe) simply because she had done it (conquering the water) together with Awiyao. It suggests that from
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