Andrew Jackson's Presidency And Policies Essay

1868 Words 8 Pages
Andrew Jackson’s Presidency and Policies
     In American history many acts of cruelty and or unjustified beliefs were acted upon. Some of these events were led by citizens and in some cases, such as the case of Andrew Jackson, led by presidents. Andrew Jackson was the seventh president of the United States of America from 1829-1837.1 His presidency and policies, such as the Indian Removal Act, and his part in The Second Bank of the U.S and South Carolina’s Tariff, will be remembered for years. They consisted of such personal opinion and were so controversial few will ever forget.
     Andrew Jackson first ran for president in 1824. His original attempt failed due to
…show more content…
He promised the south a reduction in the taxes and duties they were enduring to the levels first established in1828. These set levels were acceptable to the southerners as opposed to the higher rates enforced since then. In 1832 Jackson reduced these rates by a small margin, not nearly as much as his original promise. Regardless of South Carolina upset, in 1833 Jackson passed the Force Bill. This coerced them into paying the tariff no matter what.4
South Carolina retaliated against this insulting lack of concern for their voice in U.S. government. South Carolina then opted to act upon the Doctrine of Nullification and they threatened to break away from the union.2 Within this doctrine, South Carolina would preserve the right to null and void a law if they felt it was unconstitutional. South
Carolina was then able to declare the laws of 1828 and 1832 invalid, and prohibited the collection of the tariffs after February of 1833.4
Jackson’s response to the S.C. doctrine was explained with the creation of his Nullification Proclamation, on December 10,1832. He declared his vigorous intent to reinforce the law and was willing to seek an agreement that would eventually lower the unsatisfactory tariffs. In 1833 congress passed a comprise bill which would set a new tariff. When this new deal was accepted by all other
Open Document