Andy Warhol: Influence on the Twentieth Century Pop Art Movement

1065 Words Jun 13th, 2008 5 Pages
As a profound influence on the twentieth century pop art movement, Andy Warhol ascended to become a cornerstone in the modern art world. After taking cues from society in the mid-twentieth century, as well as conversing with Muriel Latow, Warhol did what many artists strived to do but failed. Andy also extracted many of his ideas from other artists and built on them. He put a culture on canvas and revolutionized pop art for a life time. The nineteen sixties, seventies, and eighties were periods of self righteousness and discovery. With many new styles and beliefs arising during those eras, Warhol’s imagination would begin to produce ideas that were unheard of but revolutionary at the same time. American values were altered and so …show more content…
“The potent memory of the pathos and mystery of Marilyn’s death with the long-lived speculation surrounding it elevated her to the greatest modern star status. Warhol’s paintings participated in the public consolidation” (Copplestone 25). “Andy exaggerated the features of Marilyn Monroe that had made her beautiful” (Bolton 19). Also, the popularity of celebrities such as Jackie Kennedy and Elvis Presley soon began to sweep the nation (Wrbican). Warhol saw these people as icons for the sixties and also saw them as an inspiration to what would become his new art works. Despite how happy, pretty, or ideal the celebrities seemed on television, they were disasters in reality and Warhol executed his exposure of these secrets through pop art. After World War two had ended and the United States had entered the Vietnam War, the theme of mortality became less shocking to the population than in the years prior. With the acceptance of such things, Warhol decided to create a series of brutal artwork that would exemplify the understanding of life and death. “His series of death and disaster included paintings of electric chairs, suicides, and car crashes” (Wrbican). Warhol wanted the public to see what really goes on in society when people make destructive decisions. “Warhol used powerful, hard-hitting picture that summed up the way society was becoming so used to images of horror that they were no longer shocked by

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