Answer Booklet Judaism

7864 Words Nov 12th, 2010 32 Pages
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SYLLABUS
Students learn about: | Students learn to: | Significant People and Ideas * the contribution to Judaism of ONE significant person or school of thought, other than Abraham or Moses, drawn from: * Isaiah * Hillel (and Shamai) * Beruriah * Rabbi Solomon Isaac (Rashi) * Moses Maimonides * Kabbalah * The Hassidim * Moses Mendelssohn * Abraham Geiger * Rabbi Isaac Abraham Hacohen Kook (Rav Kook) * Jewish Feminism * another person or school of thought significant to Judaism * the effect of that person OR school of thought on JudaismEthics * ONE of the following areas of ethical teaching in Judaism: * bioethics * environmental ethics * sexual ethicsSignificant practices in the life of
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The development and expression of Judaism from its start in God's revelation to one person (Abraham) to the important worldwide religion of today is due to the contribution of a number of significant people and schools of thought and of course the continuation of the community of believers worldwide. One of these special people was Moses Maimonides. * Using the above information and the diagram on the next page, explain how Christianity, Judaism and Islam are linked.

All 3 religions can trace their origins back to a common source and that is the leaders of each of the religion can be traced back to Adam. This means that all 3 religions have some aspects of commonality such as the belief of 1 god and all people are descendants of Adam and Eve.

Family Tree of David

History of Judaism

MOSES MAIMONIDES
(1135-1204)

Jewish sacred writings include the Torah and Talmud. The Talmud is the authoritative record of rabbinic discussions on all aspects of Jewish life and includes religious law, ethics, customs and the stories which define the religious history. The Talmud is made up of two parts: Mishneh; and the Gemara which is a literary expansion of the ideas in the Mishneh. The Torah is also called the Law, and is the written law. The Talmud is referred to as the oral law, and it has become the basis for all later codes or writings of Jewish law. Of all the

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