Anthropological Analysis of Hisat'sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land Without Water

583 Words Jan 13th, 2018 2 Pages
Edited by Christian E. Downum, Hisat'sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land Without Water offers a collection of articles that are written for a popular audience. However, the articles are well written and thoroughly researched using primary sources. The articles are also accessible and devoid of too much jargon or technical figures. As it is written for a popular audience, it brings these issues to light and raises awareness about the prehistory of the Americas. The title of the book refers to the Hopi word for what the Navajo call the Anasazi. Spaniards had referred to the same people as the people in a land without water: the sierra sin agua.
Hisat'sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land Without Water contains twenty articles in total, and also includes maps, timelines, and photographs of the archaeological digs. Because one of the overarching themes about the Hisat'sinom people as discussed by all the authors is the relationship between the people and the land, the photographic images contained in Downum's book provide rich visual accompaniments that highlight the "peoples in a land without water."
Downum's book is useful from both an archaeological and an anthropological standpoint. From an archaeological standpoint, Hisat'sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land Without Water offers information about different sites…

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