Apple Inc vs Microsoft

4573 WordsFeb 20, 201119 Pages
Table of Contents Page Introduction 2 Apple, Inc Overview 3 Apple’s Branding Strategy 4 Apple’s Brand Equity 5 Microsoft’s Marketing Strategy 6 Microsoft’s Branding Strategy/Equity 8 Apple vs. Microsoft Operating systems 9 Advertising Campaigns 10 Effectiveness/Conclusion 13 Appendix A 16 Apple Balance Sheet 17 References 18 Introduction The psychological perception of a company is a very important aspect, often overlooked by marketing analysts. This concept reveals the company’s perception in regards to how the consumers view its reputation in the marketplace. Microsoft was perceived as old and stagnant in the last ten…show more content…
It is arguable that without the price-premium, which the Apple brand sustains in many product areas, the company would have exited the personal computer business several years ago. Small market share PC vendors with weaker brand equity have struggled to compete with the supply chain and manufacturing economics of Dell. Apple has made big advances in becoming more efficient, particularly in logistics and operations, but it was difficult to make a profit at the price levels Dell transacts. ("Apple," 2008). From a brand architecture viewpoint, the company maintains a "monolithic" brand identity - everything being associated with the Apple name, even when investing strongly in the Apple iPod and Apple iTunes products. Apple's current line-up of product families includes not just the iPod and iTunes, but iMac, iBook, iLife, iWork, and now iPhone. However, even though marketing investments around iPod are substantial, Apple has not established an "i" brand. While the "i" prefix is used only for consumer products, it is not used for a large number of Apple's consumer products (e.g. Mac mini, Mac Book, Apple TV, Airport Extreme, Safari, QuickTime, and Mighty Mouse). So far, Apples' branding strategy is bearing fruit. For example, Apple reports that half of all computer sales through its retail channel are to people new to Macintosh, the
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