Applications of the Self-Efficacy Theory in Long-term Degenerative Neurological Conditions

1266 WordsFeb 22, 20185 Pages
Using a Self-efficacy Based Model to Explore the Applicability of the Self-efficacy Theory in Long-term Degenerative Neurological Conditions: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Targeted Journal: Journal of Neurology & Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Introduction: A long-term degenerative neurological condition (LTDNC) is a term used to describe diseases that affect the nervous system leading to its degeneration. Conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis etc. are all categorized by impairment in brain, nerve and spinal cord pathway cells (Canadian Institute for Health Information, 2007). Due to such disruptions, the nerve signals between the brain and the body are affected which result in problems with walking, controlling movement, balance, full or partial paralysis, breathing and talking problems, occurrence of seizures, lack of bladder and bowel control at later stages, and even problems with the heart (Canadian Institute for Health Information, 2007). In 2011, the Canadian Institute for Health Information reported that Canada has one of the highest incidences of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the world, where approximately 93,500 individuals are currently affected. Despite the prevalence of the disease, there is still much that remains unknown. According to the 2012 statistics from the ALS Society of Canada, the number of new diagnoses per year is

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