Applying Bowenian and Structural Theories Essay

1708 Words Nov 28th, 2014 7 Pages
Applying Bowenian and Structural Theories
Applying Bowenian & Structural Theories
For this assignment, two different theoretical approaches will be discussed, Bowenian family therapy and structural family therapy, and they will be used individually to construct a treatment plan to help clients reach their goals. Within each treatment plan discussed, short-term and long-term goals of therapy will be established and the family’s presenting problems will be defined. Two techniques that will be assigned to help them reach their therapeutic goals and any expected outcome from using those techniques will be discussed.
The Presenting Problems
Judy, Adrian, and Pamela are a family of three that have all come into
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This technique was chosen because Pamela uses anger and/or shutting down to cope with perceived threats within her family. The entire family could benefit from this technique so that they may go from using emotionally reactivity to shifting towards a more functional cognitive process while engaging with one another (Gladding, 2010).
Differentiation of self
This a good technique to use because there is a high level of fusion occurring between Pamela and her parents (Psychotherapy.net). Pamela is dominated by her automatic emotional responses (anger and shutting down) and appears to lack functional levels of adaption and flexibility, especially during high stress times or when expected to do things independently. Pamela cuts herself off from the family emotionally in attempts to avoid being controlled or overwhelmed. Judy has given up on being close with Pamela and has accepted the emotional distance present between them.
Expected Outcome
The expected outcome for using both of these techniques is to decrease the symptoms plaguing the family but more specifically increase the overall wellness of the entire family system. Using nonanxious presence will help demonstrate lower levels of arousal and better communication skills (Gladding, 2010). The family may learn not to react as emotionally with one another, thus lower the intensity when they…