Araby: Short Story and Brown Imperturbable Faces

4962 WordsJan 4, 201120 Pages
CONTENTS Page Thesis Statement and Outline 02 I. The Domination of Darkness 03 Đỗ Kim Ngân 03-05 Trần Thị Thu Hiền 05-06 II. The Indifference Attitude 07 Lâm Thị Phương Nga 07-08 Đào Ngọc Ánh 08-10 III. The Bare Surroundings Together With the Empty and Slow Train 11 Đỗ Thị Hằng 11-13 IV. The Unilateral Love 14 Trần Đức Minh 14-15 Nguyễn Kiều Trang 15-16 Appendix: Araby by James Joyce Thesis statement: The short story Araby by James Joyce (1882-1941) depicts a picture which extends to us a profound impression about a gloomy, lukewarm stagnant and sultry life of Dubliners in 1890s. OUTLINE I. The domination of darkness throughout the story…show more content…
The domination of darkness was emphasized by the image of pale light in this paragraph. When the night fell, streetlights were but “feeble lanterns” (18) in the somberness of the “dark muddy lanes”(20). The light from the kitchen windows only filled the street when boys returned; however, the boy chose to hide in the shadow. This action made the darkness again cover all the light which had just appeared in a short time. In the blind and dark surroundings like this, only the boys’ games and shouts “echoed the silent street” (19) and made the story have some breaks , but the boys must still play in “dark muddy lanes”(20), in “dark dripping gardens” (21) near “dark odorous stables” (22) and “ashpits” (22). The boys’ life was the same as what it was suggested in the first paragraph. They could not go anywhere except this stagnant city. Scanning through the story, the readers could easily see that all the scenes in this story often happened in the dark setting. Joyce used such setting to express his intention when he wrote the stories “Dubliners”. He wanted to “write a chapter in the moral history” of his country and he chose Dublin city for the scene “because that city seemed to me the centre of paralysis”(The Archetypal Myth of the Quest in J. Joyce's "Araby" written by Mahmood Azizi, para. 4, line 6). Actually, choosing the gloomy setting to be the home of the young boy, Joyce made the boy’s life particularly and the Dubliners’ lives
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