Arcadian Microarray

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See discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228180753 Arcadian Microarray Technologies, Inc. ARTICLE · OCTOBER 2008 READS 516 2 AUTHORS, INCLUDING: Robert F. Bruner University of Virginia 287 PUBLICATIONS 1,490 CITATIONS SEE PROFILE Available from: Robert F. Bruner Retrieved on: 25 January 2016 Username: TO ACCESS THIS DOCUMENT This is a protected document. The first two pages are available for everyone to see, but only faculty members who have verified faculty status with Darden Business Publishing are able to view this entire inspection copy. Submit VERIFIED FACULTY If you have verified faculty status with Darden Business Publishing,…show more content…
Copyright © 2005 by the University of Virginia Darden School Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All rights reserved. To order copies, send an e-mail to sales@dardenpublishing.com. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, used in a spreadsheet, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the permission of the Darden Foundation. ◊ -2- UVA-F-1496 Arcadian Microarray Technologies, Inc. Following the completion of the Human Genome Project1 in 2003, which sought to map the entire human DNA sequence2, several companies had developed technologies for researchers to exploit that mountain of data. Specifically, those new products helped scientists find the links between the variations in a person’s genetic code and their predisposition to disease. It was hoped that ultimately this would usher in an era when disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention could be tailored to an individual’s unique genetic identity. Arcadian Microarray Technologies, Inc.,3 headquartered in Arcadia, California, was founded in 2003 by seven research scientists, two of whom had been major contributors to the Human Genome Project itself. The team had developed a unique DNA scanning device in the form of a waferlike glass chip that could allow scientists to analyze thousands of human genes or gene fragments at one time,

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