Arguments Against The Electoral College

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Every time there is an election in the United States, the debate of Electoral College always heats up, and suddenly everybody seems to know about or at least they are interested in learning about it. The Electoral College is firmly established under the United States Constitution to elect the president and the vice president of the United States indirectly. A slate of “electors” are chosen from each state, and they are the ones responsible for voting for president in the general elections depending on which party the candidate is vying with. From this statement, what it means is that one does not choose his or her preferred leader directly and this has made many suggestions that the Electoral College is not a true representation of democracy. This paper will look at the strongest arguments for and against the Electoral College, analyze whether the current Electoral College should be re-engineered or scrapped in favor of direct vote and finally determine if the Electoral College is consistent or contrary to democratic principle.
Several times in the US history, a president has won the election even without winning the overall national vote as George W. Bush did in 2000. To the other countries that practice no such electoral process, this might seem very unusual and hard to understand. Apparently, they are not alone because some Americans also feel that there needs to be a change to the constitutional provision as they feel it undermine their democracy and the overall
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