Aristotelian Criticism : The Monk 's Tale

2417 Words Nov 21st, 2014 10 Pages
Aristotelian Criticism: The Monk’s Tale
Abstract: Aristotle’s theory of Greek Tragedy was originally intended for Greek plays, but it can be extended to other non-Greek pieces such as novels, short stories, and poetry. The formula contains four key components recommended for tragic tales. The elements of this theory (koros, hubris, ate, and catharsis) can be noted in every tale told by the Monk within The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This relationship will be the main focus of the succeeding composition. Tragic stories can be evaluated in many forms using different methods. One of these approaches, Aristotle’s theory of Greek Tragedy, has become a common formula for examining the value of tragic works. All of the components included in this theory are a reflection of what Aristotle felt made a good tragedy. The elements of this theory (koros, hubris, ate, and catharsis) can be noted in every tale told by the Monk within The Canterbury Tales. One work frequently linked to Aristotle’s theory is the tragic Greek play Oedipus the King, by Sophocles. Perhaps this universal comparison is used due to Aristotle’s high opinion of the work as a perfect tragedy. Although Chaucer’s poem isn’t a Greek play, it would still be prudent to apply the components of Aristotle’s theory to the Monk’s short, tragic tales comprised in “The Monk’s Tale,” of The Canterbury Tales. In doing so, it will be apparent that Aristotle’s influence reached many future writers, whether they were…
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