Art as an Embodied Imagination

22095 WordsJan 13, 201389 Pages
ied ImJournal of Consumer Research, Inc. Speaking of Art as Embodied Imagination: A Multisensory Approach to Understanding Aesthetic Experience Author(s): Annamma Joy and John F. Sherry, Jr. Reviewed work(s): Source: Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 30, No. 2 (September 2003), pp. 259-282 Published by: The University of Chicago Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/376802 . Accessed: 22/10/2012 06:18 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital…show more content…
The former makes individuals aware of their bodies in their thoughts and actions, while the latter involves all the unrecognized activities, including the neural processes of message transmission and learning that enable individuals to think and act (see Lakoff and Johnson [1999] for an extended discussion). To date, with the exception of the research by Zaltman and his colleagues (Zaltman 1997; Zaltman and Coulter 1995, 2000), there are no published studies in consumer behavior that focus primarily on embodiment processes at the cognitive unconscious level. Throughout the history of Western culture, the state of one’s body has been interpreted as a material sign of the moral character within (Foucault 1979). Consumers therefore try to carefully monitor the physical appearance of their bodies, control the foods and substances they ingest, and protect their environment. These personal motivations manifest a form of self-discipline (the disciplinary gaze has become an ordering principle of social life): the consumer adopts the perspective of his or her self, so it becomes natural to regard one’s body as a socially visible object that can and should be reconstructed to convey preferred meanings (Joy and Venkatesh 1994). In building a self-image and an identity, consumers engage in continuous processes (moral and otherwise) that subject
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