Articles of Confederation vs. Constitution 1

1415 Words Oct 7th, 2008 6 Pages
ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION VS. CONSTITUTION

There were many differences between the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution. At the end of the American Revolution the free states needed some sort of control that would generate to a unified country. Issues arose such as: How should power be divided between local and national governments? How should laws be made, and by whom? Who should be authorized to govern those laws? How could the government be designed to protect the unalienable individual rights? Their first attempt at solving this issue was the Articles of Confederation, which was a failure for the most part, but not completely. After the failure of the articles, the state delegates tried to revise the articles, but
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In general, the poorer classes of society. Most of the Antifederalists thought that the Constitution required a bill of rights. State governments already had bills of rights but the antifederalists were afraid that they might be overridden by the Constitution. On the opposing side, there were the Federalists. Federalists were supporters of the Constitution that desired a strong central government. Federalists felt that the Articles of Confederation were weak and ineffective. They felt that National government would protect the rights of the people.
While their inexperienced ideas at creating a new republican government were practiced, the articles proved to be very weak. George Washington called for a convention in late May 1787; in order speak about the nation’s political and economical problems and revise the Articles. Delegates from eleven out of the thirteen states attended this convention. They decided on a government consisting of three branches: legislative (Congress), executive (the President), and judicial (Supreme Court). These branches were under the checks-and-balances in order to maintain balance in powers and to prevent tyranny in the country. Delegates believed this separation of powers into three different branches would ensure that the United States would not become another monarchy. While constructing a new legislative branch, delegates from Virginia and New
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