' Artificial Nigger ' and ' Judgement Day ' Analysis Regarding Color

1590 Words Nov 12th, 2012 7 Pages
“Artificial Nigger” & “Judgement Day” Analysis Regarding Color

After reading this story over five times I certainly think I have an understanding of what this story is about. Mr. Head is an old racist who believes everything that he says is word. He is domineering and seems to argue with Nelson whenever he gets the chance. Whether it be about the place Nelson calls home or the color of skin. Nelson is only ten; it makes you wonder why a man who is supposedly intelligent seems awfully absurd.
O’Connor associates the role of color in regards to race. Through her portrayal of race, apart from color, she draws a link between the roles people play in society. Not only do these elements of race refer to color and positions in society, but
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As they dismount the train Nelson soon becomes aware that his grandfather is in fact lost. When Nelson criticizes his grandfather for having gotten them lost, Mr. Head replies, “If you want to direct this trip, I’ll go on by myself and leave you right here.” O`Connor then depicts Mr. Head as being “pleased to see the boy turn white.” This is very ironic because Nelson is in fact white skinned. Following much talk of seeing “Nigger after Nigger,” the reader is left with the feeling that Mr. Head is not only happy to have silence Nelson, but further emphasizes the very color of Nelson’s face. This solidifies the character of Mr. Head as one who is so disgusted by Negros that he attempts to turn even his grandson whiter. As Nelson and Mr. Head continue on in search of the train station to take them home, they come across a rich neighborhood full of mansions. After having received directions from a passer-by, Mr. Head catches the glimpse of a plaster figure of a Negro just down the road. “One of his eyes was entirely white and he held a piece of brown watermelon.” O’Connor has chosen her words very carefully. No eye is completely white, but in depicting this figure O`Connor wishes to show that in this world African Americans are forced to see the world in white. Whiteness in this regard is being thrust upon them. Not only are Negros forced to view the world in White, the
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