Assessing Walter Hixson's Review of Tom Clancy's Novels and Their Impact on American National Security

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January 5, 2012 Article Review Lord Byron once remarked that, "Truth is always strange; stranger than fiction." In assessing Walter Hixson's review of Tom Clancy's novels and their impact on American national security it is striking to witness the degree to which an invented fictional reality and the real world played off one another for each other's benefit. In Hixon's review his primary argument is that the popularity of Clancy's novels both with large swaths of the public and in the national security apparatus stems from his exaltation of American exceptional-ism, demonization of domestic and foreign enemies and promotion of military technology as a national security panacea. In essence, Clancy's novels promote an ideological perspective on national security which reinforces fundamental narratives which national security powerbrokers want the public to believe in order to support military procurement and foreign policy initiatives. In order to support his claims, the author provides a variety of sources as evidence. The Reagan administration's open-door policy towards Clancy and personal invitation to dine with the President stands out. However, the most objective evidence provided in regards to the government's embrace of Clancy is the degree of access the film-versions of his novels received in contrast with less ideologically-supportive films. When making The Hunt for Red October, a film which promotes demonization of the Soviet state and supports American naval

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