Atticus's Relationships

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To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee takes place in Alabama during the Depression, and is recited by the protagonist, a little girl named Jean Louise "Scout" Finch. Her family consists her father, Atticus Finch who is a lawyer and has very high morals. The other member is Jem, her brother along with their cook and housekeeper Calpurnia, who is African-American and is like a part of their family. Other than these three, the recurring characters in the story include Dill , the infamous Boo Radley, Mayella Ewell, Tom Robinson , Mrs. Dubose and Alexandra, Atticus’s sister. The whole story takes place amid a time frame of three years. The story first focuses…show more content…
It then picks up, when Atticus takes up a case concerning a black man named Tom Robinson, who has been accused of raping a very poor white girl named Mayella Ewell, a member of the infamous Ewell family, who belongs to the layer of Maycomb society that people refer to as "trash." The Finch family faces harsh censure in the heavily racist town of Maycomb because of Atticus's choice to defend Tom. Even their own family criticize Atticus’ choice to fight for an African-American man. Regardless of all this , Atticus stands firm on his decision and contests in court. Even though he sees that the jury won’t take an African-American man’s word against that of a white girl, he gives his best. They end up losing the case but Atticus feels a little gratified knowing that the jury took some time for concluding a final statement. Rob Robinson later dies while trying to escape from prison, while the Ewell’s plot their revenge against the…show more content…
During the time of depression, racism and poverty were a common issue. People with a dark skin tone, i.e the African- Americans were seen as derogatory and treated like dirt. Harper Lee depicts it in a very realistic way. Though most of the town Maycomb feels negatively and discriminates the African-Americans, characters like Atticus show us how one person can impact his surroundings if he has high morals. Although he couldn’t change the mindset of the other town residents , he made sure that his own children didn’t discriminate people, purely on the basis of their skin colour. Racism can be seen even in the first few chapters of the book. Like in chapter 8 , when the kids are attempting to build a snowman without an adequate supply of snow, they substitute dirt instead, resulting in a dark-complexioned snowman, to which Scout, a sweet, conscientious and nonjudgmental girl innocently remarks, "Jem, I ain't ever heard of a nigger snowman,”(Lee, 1960 : 73) These racist comments by nonracist children typify the culture in which they were growing
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