Australian Wine Industry

1768 Words Apr 19th, 2012 8 Pages
1 Synopsis

Today as the world around us continues to age more and more people have an interest for premium wines. As Australia’s economy continues to boom some industries have taken a major hit over the last decade including Australia’s wine industry even though it continues to produce some of the best wines in the world. The report will look into the history of Australian wine and look at where things have gone wrong. The reports key findings will reveal a relatively unknown winery in the town of Orange, called Belgravia that produces some outstanding wines. The results that have been presented have been researched on various Internet resources, newspaper articles and journals. The writer has also contributed to the report with his
…show more content…
A Short history of wine)
By the middle half of the 1800’s Phylloxera, a disease in the vines destroyed over two thirds of the vineyards in Europe and by 1875 Australia fell victim (John Beeston. (2008). History of Wine in Australia) However with the strict regulations implemented in Australia, South Australia’s Barossa Valley remained free from Phylloxera and today has some of the oldest vines remaining in the world.
By the 1980’s domestic wine consumption per capita had reached 17.3 litres, as the ‘bag in a box’ an Australian innovation had been perfected. (John Beeston. (2008). History of Wine in Australia)
In the Table Fig.1 below you can see and overview of the Australian wine sector in 2007, it shows Australia’s biggest export markets as well as the most produced varietals in the country the top being Chardonnay. In the last twenty years the Australian industry however has suffered and Bob Oatley former owner of Rosemount got out at the right time and made a fortune. It was only in the 1980’s that governments sponsored growers to pull out their vines to overcome the glut of wine grapes. With low grape prices in the last seven years there has been debate for yet another sponsored vine pull. (Nance Haxton (2006) “Grape Glut”) Still today wineries continue to sell clean skins to try and combat their poor sales at basically a

More about Australian Wine Industry