Autonomy and Responsibility in Nazi Germany

1435 Words Jul 12th, 2018 6 Pages
Autonomy and Responsibility in Nazi Germany

Throughout history, the struggle of people finding their rights in society has played a major role, especially in the Nazi ideology. During this struggle, societies tried to determine who had rights, what a person owed to society and the duties of an individual. Nazis believed in the Volk, which meant people in the sense of a race, not individuals. Nazis saw the Volk as the major component in society, and therefore based the rest of their beliefs on a person's place in the society on the idea of preserving the pure Volk. The rights a person obtained were based on achieving this goal of preserving the Volk as well. The Nazi view of autonomy and responsibility of the individuals in
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Thus, they eliminated all rights these non-citizens had in the nation, including the right to exist.

The extermination of the non-Germans was seen to them as a way of preventing contamination of the German culture. They were afraid that Jews wanted to take over the world and that would destroy the platforms of the nations. They believed that ìJews destroy the peoples both in religion and moralsî and exterminating them was the only way to keep German power.3 In order to exterminate these people, the Final Solution was enacted in 1935. The Final Solution began with the Nuremberg Laws. These laws denied citizenship to Jews, based a person's race on their ancestry, prohibited Jews from marrying Germans, ended exemptions on restrictions for Jewish veterans, prohibited the employment of Germans by Jews, and required that all Jews wear the star of David at all times for easy identification.4 The second step came in 1938 when Jews, Gypsies, Communists, and Socialists were shipped to concentration camps and the real extermination began in the gas chambers.5 The Nazis saw people not of the main volk as nothing and therefore did not even think that they had the right to live.

Once a person was considered a German citizen, their rights were officially established. Germans were given equality in their rights, in the nation and in comparison to other countries. However, the state was the main provider of the opportunities of the

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