Bartleby the Scrivener, Deeply Symbolic Essay examples

1080 Words Dec 29th, 2007 5 Pages
Bartleby the Scrivener, a Deeply Symbolic Work

"Bartleby the Scrivener," is one of the most complicated stories Melville has ever written, perhaps by any American writer of that period. It id a deep and symbolic work, its make you think of every little detail differently. It makes you realize that a little detail actually make a difference and give a meaning to the story analysis.
The walls are controlling symbols of the story; in fact some had said that it's a parable of walls. Melville tells us explicitly that certain prosaic facts are indispensable to understand a story (Leo Marx 1970). One of the walls, which is part of sky-light shaft, is white. And it provides the best light available, with the sky invisible. There is no
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Some had interpreted his phrase as a scream for help, as if he is shouting "I am a human being, I can and will make choices concerning my own life." But when his preferences are completely ignored and he is sent to the city prison, he gives up on life and dies. It appeared to him as if he had lost the one element of humanity he seemed to possess. Others said that, his refusal of the lawyer's request has been read as a critique of the materialism of American culture that was growing at this time. Where it is pretty much significant in the story that the lawyer's office is on Wall Street and Wall Street was at that time becoming the hub of financial activity in the U.S. His refusal amounts to a heroic opposition to economic control. That shows how the theme of this story is extremely subtle, and that gives the story its popularity among readers allover the world.
The last paragraph can't be left without analysis; it's where a new mystery was revealed. It is the one thing the lawyer had discovered about Bartleby; the rumor that Bartleby once worked in the Dead Letter office, and was fired in an administrative shake-up. "Dead letters! Does it not sound like dead men? … On errands of life, these letters speed to death…" The lawyer wonders whether it was the lonely depressing job, reading letters meant for people now gone or dead, which drove Bartleby into his final stillness beneath a prison-yard tree…