Beating on Against the Current Essay

1269 Words 6 Pages
Beating On Against the Current “Each of us inevitable Each of us limitless – each of us with his or her right upon the earth, Each of us allowed the eternal purports of the earth, Each of us here as divinely as any is here” (Whitman 27). From out of the jazz soaked streets of New York City, arose a group of young poets and writers overwrought with the opportunity of their lives, and endeavored to capture its girth through the honesty and vulnerability of their words. These young bohemians would later lead the Beat Movement, which inspired young Americans throughout the county in their search for something more than the consumerism and conformity that plagued their society. Jack Kerouac’s On the Road is a transcendent work that …show more content…
Beating On Against the Current “Each of us inevitable Each of us limitless – each of us with his or her right upon the earth, Each of us allowed the eternal purports of the earth, Each of us here as divinely as any is here” (Whitman 27). From out of the jazz soaked streets of New York City, arose a group of young poets and writers overwrought with the opportunity of their lives, and endeavored to capture its girth through the honesty and vulnerability of their words. These young bohemians would later lead the Beat Movement, which inspired young Americans throughout the county in their search for something more than the consumerism and conformity that plagued their society. Jack Kerouac’s On the Road is a transcendent work that strives to embrace the fullness of life in all of its incoherency by rejecting conformity through the idealism of the Beat movement and the influence of his friend Neal Cassady.
To the average American in the 1940’s, “Beat” was a slang term used to describe someone who was down and out, financially physically and emotionally in life. But to Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsburg, and William S. Burroughs, his friends and major influences of the movement, “Beat” always held a dichotomous positive and negative connotation; in the sense that it was only when an individual reaches the darkest and most desperate moments could one see honestly and speak truthfully (Gewirtz 11).
From Kerouac’s group of friends at Columbia University, came the core group of
Open Document