Becoming Black : Rap And Hip Hop, Race, Gender, Identity, And Politics Of Esl Learning

1632 Words Aug 10th, 2015 7 Pages
PART ONE B

While searching through the journal database, I came across an article entitled Becoming Black: Rap and Hip-Hop, Race, Gender, Identity, and the Politics of ESL Learning by Awad El Karim M. Ibrahim. The author addresses many dimensions relevant to my own inquiry, which lead to a series of questions asked about its methodology and problematizing ‘identity’ in the reading:

“At the end of the 20th century, when identity formation is increasingly mediated by technological media, who learns what, and how is it learned?” (Ibrahim, pg. 349) “How do differently raced, gendered, sexualized, abled, and classed social identities enter the process of learning a second language?” (Ibrahim, pg. 349) “In a postcolonial era when postcolonial subjects are constituting part of the Metropolitan ‘centers’, what is the ‘critical pedagogy’ required in order not to repeat the colonial history embedded in the classroom relationship between white teachers and students of color?” (Ibrahim, pg. 349) “At a time when the North American blackness is governed by how it is negatively located in a race conscious society, what does it mean for a Black ESL learner to ‘take up’ and acquire Black English as a Second Language (BESL)?” (Ibrahim, pg. 349) “In other words, what symbolic, cultural, pedagogical, and identity investments would a learner have in locating oneself politically and racially at the ‘margin’ of representation?” (Ibrahim, pg. 349-350) “In the case of African youths, whose…

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