Before Delving Into The Economics Of The Proposed Policy,

1554 WordsFeb 23, 20177 Pages
Before delving into the economics of the proposed policy, the paper will first show why marijuana is the safer alternative, but as previously mentioned, alcohol and marijuana are still harmful to the body, just in different magnitudes. The World Health Organization (WHO) has been able to directly identify 30 diseases that are attributable to alcohol consumption and although these disorders are not as fatal as other chronic diseases, they still rank fourth among the most disabling diseases in low to middle income countries and third most in high income countries3. The organization has also been able to link alcohol consumption with cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neuropsychiatrist disorders, liver and pancreatic disease, and…show more content…
Because alcohol adversely affects the immune system, it should come as no shock that consumption increases the risk of being infected with TB, and HIV/AIDS, among other infectious diseases3. Alcohol dependence leads to a higher chance of being unemployed and living in crammed public shelters, which in turn increases the risk of being infected with these diseases3. Additionally, experimental studies show that alcohol consumption lead to a greater inclination to practice unsafe sex, raising the risk for HIV/AIDS3. Like alcohol, marijuana consumption can also lead to diseases and disorders. Marijuana is especially harmful to youth as it affects brain development due to exposure to THC, the key ingredient in marijuana. One key issue with marijuana consumption by adolescents is the risk of addiction. Approximately 9% of those who experimented with marijuana became addicted and the probability increases to 1 in 6 if smoking began when the individual was a teen1. Researchers have found that individuals who smoked marijuana as adolescents had a neural impairment in the brain, specifically in the areas responsible for self-conscious awareness, memory, and habits, which may explain why frequent use has been seen to result in declines in IQ1. Much like alcohol, it is difficult to establish causality between marijuana
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