Being Filipino

1019 WordsJun 8, 20135 Pages
Being Filipino and growing up in America, my trip to the Philippines was an experience I will never forget. This was the first time I would be traveling to the place of my heritage. I was gladly going to live there for 2 years to finish my studies. I did not know too much of the Philippines, only the stuff my mother has been telling me about. She explained to me, that the weather was different in the Philippines. She told me it was very humid. That it was so humid, it was like walking in a sauna. This has become very useful, for I knew what type of clothes to bring over there. But as the day of my flight came closer, I could not help but feel nervous. I never met any of my relatives over there, nor did I know anything about the place. Then…show more content…
As the orange seatbelt sign went off, people in the plane started to hurriedly move towards the door. I stood up, and tailed the orderly crowd as we moved in a single file line. As I got closer to the door, I started to feel some nastily warm air. I felt like I walked into, what could surely be a sauna. My mother was right; the weather was definitely different from America. The air felt damp and heavy. It was surprisingly hard to breathe in the humid air. I felt sweat instantly roll from my face to my shirt. Telling me is one thing, but experiencing it, is completely different. After going through a couple security checks, immigration and customs, I was on my way out of the airport. As I made my way out, I noticed that not only was it humid, but also terribly smoggy. I anxiously looked around to find out where all the smoke was coming from. And surprisingly, it was coming from the cars. As I confusedly kept looking around, I saw a lady waving at me; it was my aunt. She and my cousin kindly helped me carry my bags as we walked to the car. On our walk, I had asked her why there was so much smog. She told me, that it was not like in America, cars in the Philippines did not have to go through a vigorously strict emissions check to be driven. I have learned that not only was the weather different, but so were the laws. Either way, the unbearably hard part was over with. As long as I did not have to fly, in coach, for another thirteen
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