Benefits of Effective Listening

1894 Words Apr 10th, 2013 8 Pages
Benefits of Effective Listening

Benefits of Effective Listening
Maryann Rieger
Brandman University
COMU-410
April 21, 2012

Benefits of Effective Listening Effective listening is one of the most important parts in communication. As noted by Elizabeth Rice (1998), “[Listening] involves caring, hearing, interpreting, evaluating, and responding to oral messages to gain a shared understanding” (Rice, 1998) There is always something to be learned when listening. As listeners, we cannot have an "I know everything" attitude. There is always a different opinion, or a new piece of information that can come to light. Listening is never a waste of time. We must pay attention and be active and total listeners when communicating with
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Inactive listening “Pretending to listen but actually spending more time thinking” (Many types of listening, 2012). Formulating our thoughts and responses before the speaker in finished. This type of listening leads to the listener missing information and not being active in the conversation. The listener is disengaged with the content after the initial point. “The listener hears the words, but little or no communication is taking place” (Jennerich, 2005).
Full Listening “Listening to understand. Seeking meaning” (Many types of listening, 2012). Full listening is putting yourself in the speakers place. It is not just understanding the meaning of the words and actively participating in the discussion. To fully listen, we must also try to understand the speaker, their background and their experiences. As Suzanne Hudd writes, “Real listening requires one to walk in the steps of another for a bit of time” (Hudd, 2008). Full listening is very active and requires the listener to be completely engaged. This is probably the most effective form of listening and takes time to learn.
Partial Listening “Listening most of the time but also spending some time day-dreaming or thinking of a response” (Many types of listening, 2012). Partial listening is better than inactive listening, as some of the content is being heard. A partial listener is easily distracted; they are either trying to