Beyond Stereotype and Comedy Analysis

1785 Words Jun 23rd, 2018 8 Pages
This model draws on the psychological perspectives that hypnotize stereotypes to possess two dimensions in their approach, which include warmth and competence. Bulk of the stereotype activities are based on the ethnicity or race. The social groups, be it the Blacks or the whites, are perceived to be warmth if they do not indulge in internal competition for the same resources; for instance, if college students do not compete for space based on their ethnicity or race, that social group would be described as warmth according to SCM model. A social group will be considered competent if they are high in status, for instance, with regard to wealth and knowledge. Consequently, lack of competition for the same resources depicts warmth at the …show more content…
The 1970s comedy, especially by the African-American, was majorly centered on the inequality and the slavery aspects that the whites had made the blacks to go through; therefore, the comedy satirized the actions as well speaking the messages of deliverance from the bondage of inequality (Panek 2004). Richard Pryor specifically stereotyped the comics to reflect the whites as the people with greed for power and had little concern for humanity. In one forum he referred to himself as an unlearned chap who talked for people to laugh yet he earned enough money to be a master of them all. This is also depicted in the George Carlin comics who depicted the whites to be the superior beings.
Comedy and stereotype
Stereotype is all over in the comedy genre and it is as if there is no comedy without stereotype! A bulk of the people and especially the comedy lovers have most of the times found telling themselves that they can never believe in the stereotype; however, this negates the rule of social learning since they always see the stereotype and it is embedded at the back of their mind and therefore they subconsciously believe in those stereotyped messages. Prevalent in the entertainment industry is the comedic stereotype with regard to race and ethnic backgrounds which generalizes
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