Essay on Biography of Charles Darwin

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Charles Darwin was a British scientist who laid the foundation of modern evolutionary theory with his concept of the development of all forms of life through the slow-working process of natural selection. His work was of major influence on the life and earth sciences and on modern thought in general.
Darwin was born in 1809 in Shrewsbury, a small market town in Shropshire, England. His wealthy physician father was the son of Erasmus Darwin who had written Laws of Organic Life. His mother was the daughter of artisan Josiah Wedgwood of dinnerware fame. Though she died when he was eight, Darwin enjoyed a happy and secure childhood loved and encouraged by four adoring sisters, an older brother named Erasmus, a team of faithful servants, and
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In his geological observations, Darwin was most impressed with the effect that natural forces had on shaping Earth’s surface. Darwin sailed from Plymouth on the Beagle four months later. Scheduled to be completed in two years, the voyage lasted for five. During that time, he wrote meticulous notes and sent them to the Geological Society in London, along with geologic and biologic specimens. A love of adventure surfaced whenever Darwin went ashore, but he also worked intensely. The years he spent exploring the South American continent and the offshore islands of the Galapagos honed his skills as a collector, observer and theorist.
Aboard the Beagle he read Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology, a book arguing that the face of the earth had changed gradually over long periods of time through the continuing, cumulative effects of local disasters such as eruptions, earthquakes, and erosion. Darwin's own observations convinced him of the accuracy of Lyell's views and established the basis for his revolutionary work on human evolution. The isolation of the voyage, combined with exposure to new elements, taught Darwin to think for himself. He developed a dedication to careful fact-gathering as well as an ability to theorize about these facts. Significantly, his geological ponderings pushed him to search for more universal laws.
Henslow had been reading letters…