'Bluest Eye'

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“No one believed that a black African could write a good book” (Satwase). In the Bluest Eye Toni Morrison uses wrong and discomfort to show the crushing consequences that come from racism. In 1950 America, racial discrimination was implied by different skin colors. The Bluest Eye shows ways in which white beauty standards hurt lives of black females, blacks that discriminate on each other and the community’s bias on who you were. Toni Morrison uses the racism of the 1950 's and shows that "It is the blackness that accounts for, that creates, the vacuum edged with distaste in white eyes". Characters that faced uncomfortable racism include Claudia MacTeer, Pecola Breedlove, and Geraldine.
Many female characters were discriminated by the
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She becomes a reminder of human cruelty and an emblem of human suffering” (Watkins).As much as Morrison concentrates on the aspect of white racism, she includes other aspects of racism that involve black attitudes toward each other as well as white attitudes toward blacks. Geraldine is a middle-class African American woman has devoted her life to removing any sort of “Funk,” whether it is dirt, disorder, or sex. Geraldine has sacrificed any pleasure she could have had for this “beauty.” She, in fact, maintains this beauty because she is fixated with society’s ideal of what makes a person beautiful. She associates beauty with skin color in much the same way as Pecola does, and therefore has learned to hate her own skin because she is not white. “She is so full of self−loathing that she wants to eliminate any trace of her color, in favor of pale skin and straight hair” (Satwase). She also decides to eliminate what she considered to be the emotional characteristics of blacks, in an effort to change her color. In her mind, the elimination of blackness meant “the careful development of thrift, patience, high morals, and good manners” while getting rid of “passion…nature… [And] the wide range of human emotions”(Colson). So she devotes her life to changing herself, and makes a “successful” transformation. She is now as pretty as a doll, and as soulless as one. Geraldine did not want to consider herself a black female do to

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