Bold Flash Case

964 Words4 Pages
BoldDisk, currently known as Boldflash, was founded in 1982 in Waltham Massachussets. Originally manufacturing computer storage medias like floppy disks for original equipment manufacturers and consumer markets, BoldFlash 's product mix has evolved in due course of time. In 2012, the company began offering customers contemporary solutions in flash memory for products such as digital cameras, mp3s and most importantly smartphones, the latter accounting for 40% of the overall market . However, the inability of the company to keep up to date with the dynamic nature of this 20 billion dollar market has led to the decline of the company in regards to product innovation and customer satisfaction. Even though there are macroeconomic…show more content…
Another problem with this management approach is that it acts as hindrance to the development of new products. The ramifications of taking this McGregor 's Theory x approach, neglects non economic factors such as performance appraisal and participation which are considered as key motivators. Moreover, Maslow 's theory supports the argument that autonomy and room for personal growth are the key motivators for employees to add value to their company through the process of satisfying their own need for self actualization. When looking at this company from a political perspective, the question of how Harrison 's style of management had an effect on the company 's structure is relatively obvious. It is more important to emphasize that the crux of the matter was the major deficits in product development (2nd paragraph; further examined pp.2). According to the present paper, former vice president Jim Harrison commanded a rather strictregiment and had a management style that can be described as autocratic. That suggests the assumption that he made use of Luke 's first dimension of power, namely orders. A clearly visible way of solving conflicts with the results he was in favour of. It 's hardly surprising that this proceeding didn 't lead to a multifarious company culture, or a structure which encourages employees to bring in
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