Bondage of the Will

1642 Words May 14th, 2013 7 Pages
Martin Luther considered by many to be a great theologian makes very strong arguments against Eramus concerning grace and free will in Bondage of the Will. Both men have strong view points and are both eloquent writers, Eramus believes that man has the power to either turn towards works that lead to salvation or he has the choice not to. Eramus writes to show that man can voluntarily choose (free will) salvation apart from God. Eramus seems to believe that there exists some type of cooperativeness with mankind and God. Whereas, Luther is writing to show that there exist no cooperativeness and salvation is the work of God alone. For the purposes of this paper I will discuss Luther’s arguments in sub-section two. In this paper I will review …show more content…
These two conflicting statements can stand because in the sight of God apart from the spirit in one’s own powers nothing will be achieved. Luther is trying to convey in this section that apart from the spirit your works alone will not justify you. The spirit is opposed to the works of the law and apart from the spirit people are condemned. Luther not only uses Paul’s writings to build upon his case but by looking at the book of the law (Deuteronomy) and some of Christ sayings in John; Luther is attempting to show that his argument of works outside of the spirit is meaningless. He wishes for the readers to understand that apart from the spirit of God everything that a person does is condemned no matter the works of the law that are carried out.
Luther uses scripture to interpret scripture he was trying to show that by utilizing the scripture in the context in which is what was written the true meaning would be understood. It is not unexpected that Luther spends a lot of time dealing with the scriptures from Paul because Eramus views Paul as a promoter of free will. Luther shows that scripture denies the freedom of the will and teaches more on the sovereignty of God. This section is important because it ties into Luther’s entire argument about free will. Luther believes that free will is not more than a
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