Essay on Book Review of Eight Men Out

2131 Words May 5th, 2006 9 Pages
A Review of Eight Men Out
By: Eliot Asinof

The time was the fall of 1919, the country lye on the doorstep of what was to be known as the roaring twenties, a time best described as when the country lost its innocence, a time when a people discovered the pleasures of sin. In 1919, the U.S. has just come out of World War I, at that time known as The Great War. Our service men had went overseas for long periods of time, and spent that time among cultures it had never seen, consequently bringing back part of it when they came home. This was a time of disruption in the country, the world had changed. It was now evident that man was capable of atrocities that could end the human race, and wars that could span long years and cost many
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The man said to be able to knock down fences with the balls he hit, a man who when he played left field was were triples went to die. He got the name "Shoeless" Joe, when he was coming up in the farm system he lost one of his cleats and played the rest of the game with one shoe, hence the name "Shoeless" Joe. The team was managed by a great old man of the game "Kid" Gleason, a man who once through a no hitter against Cy Young. This was the greatest team ever assembled; a team who could not be beat by anybody, except themselves. And that is just what they did. There were many reasons the scandal that was the 1919 World Series happened, none more important, and maybe less mentioned than the greed of Charles Comiskey, the teams owner. This club may have been the best ever assembled, but it may have also been the most underpaid. No incident explains this any better than the salary of Eddie Cicotte, Eddie had won 28 games in 1917, the war had harmed 1918, but Eddie was back for 1919, but Eddie was only paid $6,000 for the 1919 season, many pitcher in the league with much less talent was paid more than twice that amount. Eddie wasn't the only one, as a whole Comiskey was paying a much smaller salary to his players than any other team would have to pay for the same talent. But for Comiskey it was all about the money. So the stage is set, we have the best team n baseball, the tightest owner

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