Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois' Influences on Equality

594 Words 3 Pages
Booker T. Washington once said, “Nothing ever comes to one, that is worth having, except as a result of hard work.” In the age of reconstruction and western expansion, civil rights bursted out like a bullet from a gun. Two men led the way into the civil rights movement, but in very different customs. Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois both were huge influences to civil rights, one founding what we know today as the NAACP and the other spoke of a philosophy known as the Atlanta Compromise. Booker T. Washington has a compelling story of sorts. He was born into slavery and climbed his way out of poverty. He received his education at the Hampton Institute and encouraged other blacks to do the same as him. Soon after he became …show more content…
Booker T. Washington once said, “Nothing ever comes to one, that is worth having, except as a result of hard work.” In the age of reconstruction and western expansion, civil rights bursted out like a bullet from a gun. Two men led the way into the civil rights movement, but in very different customs. Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois both were huge influences to civil rights, one founding what we know today as the NAACP and the other spoke of a philosophy known as the Atlanta Compromise. Booker T. Washington has a compelling story of sorts. He was born into slavery and climbed his way out of poverty. He received his education at the Hampton Institute and encouraged other blacks to do the same as him. Soon after he became something of a spokesperson for the entity of the black community at the time, focusing primarily on education and progress in social ranking for blacks everywhere. Washington believed the blacks should educate themselves in agriculture and trading. Booker T. Washington believed that industry was the way to go, instead of more classical career paths. He described his way of thought that African Americans should polish their speech, dress more culturally appropriate, and look to the white middle class as examples. Washington’s beliefs on segregation and racism were simply that if they improved the way they looked and spoke, then the way whites thought of them would improve as well. Washington explained all of this in his famous speech made