Bowlby's Theory Of Attachment

1378 Words Jun 28th, 2015 6 Pages
Bowlby (1969) and his theory of attachment:
An example of an extreme nature theorist is Bowlby (1969) and his theory of attachment. Bowlby believed that all mental health and behavioural problems could be linked to early childhood health.
Bowlby’s theory suggests that all children are biologically pre-programmed to form relationships and attachments with others before they are even born for survival and that the fear of strangers in babies and young children represents an important survival mechanism, built in by nature. Bowlby used part of Lorenz’s (1935) study that shows that attachment is innate in young ducklings and therefore has survival value. Bowlby therefore uses this to back up his own theory about attachment in children and babies.
The importance of attachment in relation to children’s emotional well-being:
The centre of the attachment theory is the parent and the child’s relationship. As the child realises who is caring for them they will rely on them to meet their needs. However, if their needs are not met their behaviour may change as an attempt to have their needs met. However, if their needs are not met their behaviour may change as an attempt to have them met. When a child sees their parent as controlling or disrespectful they will start to supress, their needs and feelings. A child may suffer from disorganised attachment because their carers movements are unpredictable due to drug or alcohol misuse. Poor attachment can affect the relationship they have…
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