Box Jellyfish Research Paper

2350 WordsMar 26, 201310 Pages
Nolan Hall GW 140 20 February 2012 Box Jellyfish: Nothing Square About It For many people, water is a source of relaxation and comfort, while others believe that it can be dangerous and deceiving, but often times people do not look at what lives among it. Whether it is a body of fresh water, or a body of salt water, many creatures lurk among the depths of seas, oceans, lakes, and rivers without gaining the attention of human beings. With this, a plethora of sea creatures that tend to remain hidden can harm human beings. People believe that sharks are the deadliest sea creature on the planet, however, this is a false statement. Sharks are most known for their terrifying attacks on humans, but they lack the qualities of a deadly creature.…show more content…
As for the blue-ringed octopus, this animal can somewhat compare to a sea wasp when it comes to staying hidden. The blue-ringed octopus can control its dermal cells, allowing it to camouflage itself in the rocks and reefs throughout their respective oceans. Also, the size of the octopus helps its case against box jellies, being that the blue-ringed octopus is no bigger than a golf ball (Barnett). But this could hurt the octopus if it is looked at from another viewpoint; the size of the box jellyfish and its tentacles are the reason that it is above the blue-ringed octopus in lethality. The length of the box jellyfish allows it to inflict more damage, and release more venom than a blue-ringed octopus. By looking at box jellies from this perspective, they are clearly more deadly than their fellow dangerous sea creatures. With the possibilities of dying by way of cardiac arrest, heart failure, drowning, and Irukandji Syndrome, box jellies have many ways to kill a human being. These aquatic devils have been on record for killing people around the Australian area since 1884. In 2003, a seven year-old boy swimming on an unprotected beach near Cairns, Australia, was stung by a sea wasp. The boy immediately screamed in pain while his grandfather pulled him out of the water. But before the boy could be administered the anti-venom, he went into cardiac arrest and died. This boy became the sixty-eighth person since 1884

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