Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

1023 Words5 Pages
In the book Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley, the character John the Savage is brought from his homeland of Malpais to London. When he arrives he finds that this world is very different from his own. Saddened and angered by the injustice of the society, he attempts to isolate himself from the world. John the Savage’s experience of being exiled from Malpais was enriching in that it showed him the true nature of the Other Place and alienating in that he was separated from his culture and not able to integrate into the new one. This illuminates the meaning of the work in that it shows the negative side of the “utopian” society. John the Savage’s exile from his homeland was enriching in that it showed him the true nature of the Other Place.…show more content…
Don’t you even understand what manhood and freedom are?’” (Huxley 212-213) This quote shows how he became aware of the injustice of the system. His discovery of the true nature of the Other Place was an enriching experience. It allowed him to no longer wonder about what the outside world was like and to no longer hold an idea in high regard that was not worthy of it. The truth is better than the lie and in learning the truth, John was enriched by his experience of being cut off from his homeland. John the Savage’s exile from his homeland was alienating in that it separated him from his culture and he was not able to integrate into the new one. John the Savage grew up in a society with very different views from that of the society in London. It was very difficult for him to not be around other people who shared similar ideas with him. This is exemplified by the quote “‘... Listen, Lenina; in Malpais people get married.” “Get what?” The irritation had begun to creep back into her voice. What was he talking about now? “For always. They make a promise to live together for always.” “What a horrible idea!” Lenina was genuinely shocked.” (Huxley 191) He was unable to connect with anyone on a deep level because of this intrinsic difference between them. Therefore, this experience was alienating for him because he was set apart from the rest of the society. The experience was so alienating that John the Savage removed himself from the society around him. “‘I shall go away
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