Buchi Emecheta's The Joys of Motherhood and Wole Soyinka's Death and the King's Horseman

1519 WordsJun 16, 20187 Pages
Colonial Life in Buchi Emecheta's The Joys of Motherhood and Wole Soyinka's Death and the King's Horseman Homi Bhaba writes that "colonial mimicry is the desire for a reformed, recognizable Other, as a subject of a difference that is almost the same, but not quite" (86). The colonizer wants and needs the colonized to be similar to himself, but not the same. If the native continues to behave in his traditional ways, he brings no economic gain to the colonizer. But, if the colonized changes too much and is found to be exactly the same as the colonizer, the colonizer is left with no argument for his supremacy. As Bhaba puts it, "in order to be effective, mimicry must continually produce its slippage, its excess, its difference" (86).…show more content…
I may even lose my job" (50). Here Nnaife shows that he only affiliates himself with the church to protect his job. Later, when he no longer works for Dr. and Mrs. Meers, Nnaife disobeys the church rules on monogamy and inherits one of his deceased brother's wives. Because he no longer needed the church to keep his job, he abandoned it, displaying that he was not truly a believer of the Christian faith. Nnu Ego appears to be even less converted to Christianity. She never truly abandons her traditional beliefs. Throughout the novel, she refers to her chi and, in the end, she is even made into a goddess herself. When she first moved to the city, Nnu Ego admitted that she "did not understand what Christianity was all about," and as she continued attending church she found that it had become "monotonous attending week after week" (48). Unlike Joseph and Amusa, Nnu Ego never even appears to accept the colonial religion as her own. Her traditional beliefs continue to guide her throughout the story. Nnu Ego first realizes that she is pregnant for a second time because of a conversation with her chi, long after she has been living in Lagos, the white man's city. After the conversation in a dream with her chi, Nnu Ego realized that it would be "difficult to explain it to him. This she knew was a bond between her and her chi and her coming child. Nnaife had little to do with it. He was

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