Can You Really Paint With All the Colors of the Wind?: The Personal Effect of Ascribed Status

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What I remember primarily about my childhood room is that I had white walls in my room, and those white walls were distinguished by two things—A painted picture of my older siblings who passed away before I was born (which seems slightly morbid when I think back upon it), and a large, framed movie poster of Disney's Pocahontas that showed the Disney-fied versions of Pocahontas and John Smith embracing passionately. Perhaps it's only natural that that poster is prominent in my memory, since the love story that Disney presented was my favorite as a child, outranked only by Gumby: The Movie in my child's mind. However, what I didn't realize as a child was the underlying implications that Pocahontas had regarding race and the status that we …show more content…
What I remember primarily about my childhood room is that I had white walls in my room, and those white walls were distinguished by two things—A painted picture of my older siblings who passed away before I was born (which seems slightly morbid when I think back upon it), and a large, framed movie poster of Disney's Pocahontas that showed the Disney-fied versions of Pocahontas and John Smith embracing passionately. Perhaps it's only natural that that poster is prominent in my memory, since the love story that Disney presented was my favorite as a child, outranked only by Gumby: The Movie in my child's mind. However, what I didn't realize as a child was the underlying implications that Pocahontas had regarding race and the status that we have according to our race, and the conception it instilled in me regarding the ideal of equality between all races. My increasing exposure to social justice issues and my continued higher education has led me to examine my own status in society, particularly my ascribed status as a white person, and I have come to realize that the struggle for racial equality is still continuing. First, we must examine the full implications of ascribed status. Ascribed status is generally assigned at birth, and includes the categorization of humans at birth according to factors such as their kinship, age, sex, caste, group, or race. For the sake of focused discussion, I will focus upon my ascribed race, which is white, as aforementioned. Because our
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