Capital Punishment: Should it be Legal? Essay

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Capital Punishment: Should it be Legal?
After the Timothy McVeigh execution over 80 percent of viewers polled supported the decision the courts made to put McVeigh to death, and even a handful of the people who supported the execution thought it was preformed in a way that was too humane. Some people say that the death penalty is the most effective way to control serious crimes such as murder, while others say that it is extremely unethical and should not be legal in a country as developed as the United States. Some opponents to the death penalty say that putting somebody to death is a less severe punishment then life in prison without parole. Other opponents say that the majority of people that support the death penalty do so because
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In the United States people that cannot afford lawyers are assigned public defenders. Public defenders are often times young, overworked, and inexperienced. This does not give poor people an equal opportunity to plead their case. Capital trials with public defenders last on average for a week. This does not give anybody enough time to plead their case. Over 90% of criminals that face the death penalty do not have they money to hire a private attorney. In 1984 the court appointed lawyer of Calvin Burdine, a gay man facing the death penalty, slept through part of his trial. Anybody whose lawyer sleeps through his or her trial is clearly not being treaded fairly and equally.
Another example of our flawed justice system is the fact that somebody is 4.3 times more likely to receive the death penalty for killing a white person then they would be for killing a black person. There have only been 10 examples of a white person being sentenced to death for killing a black person since 1976. As a result of this over 75 percent of people sitting on death row are non-Caucasian.
According to Robert Grants article, Capital Punishment and Violence, 87.5 percent of all of the executions between 1977 through 2002 in the United States occurred in the south. Having performed over a third of all of the executions, Texas comes out on top. So with
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