Case Study: The Benefits of Animal Testing Essay

1718 Words 7 Pages
Nine year old Amy has already had a rough start in life. She was born with an abnormal heart that hinders her everyday activities. Amy is unable to keep up with kids her own age because she often tires out easily. As a consequence, she has very little friends and is often alone. Amy is forced to take different medications everyday just to survive. Amy’s life consists of medicine, doctors, and constant hospital visits. However, Amy is due for a heart transplant that will save her life. The transplant goes extremely well and now Amy has the opportunity to go to high school and live a normal teenage life. Like Amy, many lives are positively transformed due to the amazing surgery of organ transplants. Scientist and doctors are due the credit …show more content…
Animal testing saves countless lives and plays a practical role in medical advances. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. In 2009, heart disease claimed the lives of some 616,067 people (“FastStats”). However, due to the continuous research done on animals, doctors have found many treatment options for heart disease. For example, surgeries such as heart transplants and coronary bypass have been made successful because of the research done on animals. “In the late 1950s” the first heart transplant was done at Stanford University on a dog (Trull 65). Without this experiment, researchers would never have fathom how to stop the body from rejecting a donated organ (Trull 65). Today many people survive heart transplants because of the testing first done with animals. In addition to surgical procedures, animal testing has been used to develop various vaccines and medicine. Vaccines are used to help the body fight off an attack of different infections and diseases (“Vaccines”). The development of medicine to fight diseases such as HIV “depends entirely on experiments in animals” (Loeb 72). These vaccines are crucial for human survival. They protect us against bacteria, viruses, and airborne pathogens. Animal experimentation also benefits people who live with life long illness. In 2010, 18.8 million people living in the United