Cash Crops

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1.5.3 Test (TS): Populism and Progressivism U.S. History Sem 2 (S2558062) Points possible: 60 Test Corina Reyes Date: ____________ The Big Question How did farmers, activists, workers and politicians face the problems of industrial America during the Populist and Progressive Eras? Section 1: Short-answer questions (30 points) In this section, you will write a two- to three-sentence response to each of the following items. Remember to use examples and be specific. 1. What factors caused many people to give up farming and move to the city? Fill in the boxes below to explain how each step led many farmers to leave their farms for a life in the city. (7 points)  Cash Crops  In the late 1800's the majority of farmers grew enough food…show more content…
Cast down your bucket among these people... —Booker T. Washington, 1895 In this speech at the Atlanta Cotton Exposition, Washington was talking to both black and white southerners. What was he telling them to do in order to be successful in the New South?  By making friends in every manly way of the people of all races, by whom you are surrounded, refers to sending your bucket deep into the well and bringing up a wealth of good stuff, and It's a metaphor for casting out your life in a friendly caring way and seeing what comes back to you. 4. Explain how each of these leaders responded to the question of race relations. (9 points) Ida B. Wells:  In 1906, Ida B. Wells joined with William E.B. DuBois and others to further the Niagara Movement, and she was one of two African American women to sign "the call" to form the NAACP in 1909. Although Ida B. Wells was one of the founding members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), she was also among the few Black leaders to explicitly oppose Booker T. Washington and his strategies. As a result, she was viewed as one the most radical of the so-called "radicals" who organized the NAACP and marginalized from positions within its leadership. W.E.B. Du Bois:  W.E.B. DuBois responded to race relations by becoming one of the founders of the NAACP
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