Censorship In Harry Potter

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According to Ray Bradbury, “There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running about with lit matches.” Censorship is a controversial topic that continues to gain attention. As various books are released, opponents that feel offended in some form begin to try and remove a book from the shelf. If the argument is lucrative enough, that book just might be removed from the shelf. As that book is removed, all the sudden other books become offensive and they too may leave the shelf. What happens when all the offensive books are gone? Will there be books left on the shelf for our children to read? Censorship is a difficult topic to discuss, however it is something that must be addressed so that school libraries…show more content…
Opponents believe that Christian viewpoints are challenged as Rowling introduces wizards and their powers, witchcraft in their eyes. As Gish states in her article, Hunting Down Harry Potter, “Deuteronomy specifically states that witches and wizards are an abomination unto the Lord that will be driven out.” She goes on to discuss that if the belief system is so strong, they do not want to read Harry Potter where this wizard is portrayed in such a positive light. Harry uses his powers for good, and some are concerned that the wizard who uses those powers for good may make their child want to dig deeper into the world of wizards. In their eyes that interest could be seen as an abomination to God. Gish also compared some of the censorship of Harry Potter to that of an oncoming truck. What parent would not rush out to save their child if they were standing in the way of an oncoming truck? To critics, Harry Potter is the oncoming truck and they are just doing what they feel is right for their child. To the critics it is important to realize while most will know this story to be a fantasy, knowing the characters and events are not real, some believe this to be a reality. There are some that truly believe wizardry is occurring and they do not want their child to be lured in to reading a book that they think promotes such black magic. Glanzer argued that…show more content…
In my mind it is no different than so many other fantasy stories I have read. I can honestly say I had not read Harry Potter until this assignment, if for no other reason than it just didn’t interest me. Did I feel like the talk of wizards and spells affected my Christianity belief system? Absolutely not. I think those that worry their children will want to learn more about witchcraft after reading the book should be more concerned with prepping their child. My daughter is not old enough yet to read the book, however, when she is we will have an open honest conversation. I would hope that the ideals and beliefs that my husband and I have instilled in my child are far stronger than the power of a book. Yes, books are powerful, but more powerful than parents? When I took something away from my daughter when she was little it made it that object even more desirable. If we ban these books, are we not doing the same? We are infringing on their intellectual freedom to have them decide for themselves what they would like to learn more about. As parents it is our job to help guide them to what is right and wrong and then pray that we have done our job effectively. We give them out experiences and help them to identify between reality and fantasy. Maybe that is why some parents so strongly oppose Harry Potter. They are concerned they have not given their children the faith system that can sustain an outside perspective. I
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